Success is not final, failure is not fatal - it is the courage to continue that counts.
- Sir Winston Churchill

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Question

Does anybody know what kind of plant this is? It is not growing in our garden, but my in laws in Oklahoma. It is a single stem, likes shade and puts on this seed pod, which could be it's bloom. The pod does nothing else, just dies off with the stem of the plant. It seems to be a perennial. The plant is only 18 inches to 2 ft tall.
Any help/info would be greatly appreciated.

14 comments:

  1. Looks like it's a dicot - - - has branched veins in the leaves - - - but that's all I can tell from the tiny picture.

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  2. Sieht fast aus wie unsere Hubschrauberblume. aber wie die Wirklich heißt kann ich Dir nicht sagen. Werde mal in den nächsten Tagen ein Foto blogen.
    Tschüss
    Doris

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  3. The leaves look like a schefflera. My mom use to grow these in pots, but I never saw a seed pod on it. Here is what I found...

    Schefflera, Queensland Umbrella Tree - Schefflera actinophylla
    Family - Araliaceae

    Habitat - Coastal strand, Flatwoods, Hammocks, Scrub

    Description - Introduced category 1 invasive species to 40 feet tall with single or multiple greenish trunks. Leaves are palmately compound with 7-16 oblanceolate leaflets which are alternately arranged & shiny green on long petioles (leaf stems). Schefflera has red flowers in summer and fall that are on large inflorescence at the stem tips. Produces large numbers of seeds which are then spread by birds. Seedlings can sometimes be seen growing in the "boots" of our native Sabal palms.

    Try googling schefflera and click on "images" and see if you find a match. Let us know what you find!

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  4. We have them all over the place in PA!!!

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  5. any chance of getting a better pic of the red seed pod, or berry ?

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  6. Thank you guys for helping my mil with this. I will see if I can get a different photo of the pod/berry from her.

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  7. Is it blooming right now? The leaves look to me like something we have around here in the spring - called a Mayapple.

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  8. Jayme, I believe it is blooming (has it's seed pod) right now. My mil said there are several all over their property and only the ones in the shade seemed to be doing well. They are wondering if these plants are a good thing, or if they might be poisonous.

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  9. I thought it looked like a Mayapple too! But the ones here in Missouri get about 5-6 ft tall. They die back to nothing and then pop up every spring!They are usually deeper in the woods.

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  10. When looking at the picture, my first thought was "mayapple", also. Mayapples are in abundance here in WV mtns. However, I have never seen the may apples have the red seed pod or bloom. I'm going to google mayapple and see what comes up.

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  11. Anke, I did Google "mayapple pictures" and the leaves definitely look the same as your picture. However they show the plant in bloom...didn't see any with the red pod, but rather a beautiful white flower.

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  12. Yes, I am sure it is a MayApple. They are quite common in the woods around my home in Kentucky. They bear a flower, a fruit, and a red seedpod.****a North American herb of the genus Podophyllum ( P. peltatum ) having a poisonous rootstock and rootlets that are a source of the drug podophyllum/it bears a yellow egg-shaped, edible but often tasteless fruit.*****from the online dictionary.

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  13. Liebe Anke,
    das scheint ja eine interessante Pflanze zu sein, ich kenne sie nicht...

    ganz lieben Dank für Deinen netten Kommentar zu den Großmütterchen-Grannys... in der nächsten Woche zeige ich das fertige Kissen...

    ein schönes Wochenende wünscht Dir Traudi, die liebe Grüße hier lässt

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