Success is not final, failure is not fatal - it is the courage to continue that counts.
- Sir Winston Churchill

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Growing (water)cress

During our three year stay in Germany the girls started growing and eating (water)cress with me. We all like the peppery taste and how easy (and fun) it is to grew. All you need is a dish, some cotton balls, water and the seeds. Normally we line our dish with wax paper for easy clean up and then add the cotton balls. Wet them, sprinkle the seeds and wet again.
Here are Hannah and Nadia stretching the cotton balls. It is not really necessary, we do it to use fewer cotton balls.
Waehrend wir in Dtld. waren haben Hannah, Nadia und ich gerne Kresse ausgesaet und gegessen. Wir lieben den etwas pfefferigen Geschmack und wie einfach es ist die Kresse zu saen. Wir nehmen einen tiefen Teller und legen ihn mit Wachspapier aus - macht das Saubermachen leichter. Nun wird der Teller mit Watte ausgelegt und die Watte befeuchtet. Kressesamen verteilen, wieder befeuchten, fertig.
Hier "dehnen" Hannah und Nadia die Watte. Ist nicht unbedingt notwendig, wir machen es um weniger Watte zu verbrauchen.Sprinkling the seeds... We did that yesterday and they are already starting to sprout.
This is something we do several times a year, during Easter we like to grow the cress in egg shells. Looks cute...
Hier verteilen die Damen die Samen. Wir haben das gestern gemacht und sie haben schon zu wachsen angefangen. Wir machen das ein paar Mal im Jahr, an Ostern machen wir es in Eierschalen. Sieht suess aus...
This is a recipe I got from Bev's sew on and sew forth blog. It is a honey-wheat (sunflower) bread. I adapted the recipe a bit and used my bread maker to make the dough and added oats instead of sunflowers. We'll see how it tasted in the morning, it smells wonderful!
Dieses Brotrezept habe ich von Bev's "sew on and sew forth" blog. Es ist ein Honig Weizen (Sonnenblumen) Brot. Ich habe das Rezept etwas geaendert und habe den Teig in der Brotbackmaschine gemacht. Ausserdem habe ich Haferflocken anstatt Sonnenblumenkerne genommen. Wie es schmeckt werde ich morgen frueh sehen, es riecht auf jeden Fall himmlisch!
If you are looking for the recipe go to the Bee Haven Acres blog and from there to Bev's sew on and so forth blog. You'll find lots of pretty and neat things there...

8 comments:

  1. anke, you say cress is easy to grow and i will have to try your method as i have had trouble growing it in pots! i will have to find some seeds and try again:) yum, that bread sounds good. thanks for sharing my friend:)

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  2. You are too sweet! And your loaf is beautiful!!!!

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  3. Leslie, we never had any problems growing cress. Our seeds are from Germany though, and it might be a different kind of cress than the cress you are trying to grow.
    Bev you are very welcome. The bread was so easy to make and it is delicious. Thank you for sharing the recipe!

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  4. Anke, great post! my husband (who's German) always had watercress salad at home. it still grows in the creek at Old Sweetwater!

    Also looked up your coffeemaker...FAB! "Gehen Sie stark oder gehen Sie nach Hause," indeed! *wink*

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  5. Anke....do you realize the difficulty I had in reading this? COTTON BALLS!? I was covered in chills and had to quickly scroll past the photos. Sounds like such a neat, cool idea...if I just didn't need cotton balls!!

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  6. Janean, where is your husband from? Does he speak German?
    Jayme, I'm so sorry. I forgot about your cotton balls phobia... You could probably try paper towels instead. This stuff grows on anything...

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  7. Ich liebe den Geschmack von Kresse. Gerade im Winter schnell, gesund und wundervoll im Geschmack. Dein Brot sieht wieder einmal zum reinbeißen lecker aus.
    Lieben Gruß, Petra

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  8. Anke, I don't think I have ever had watercress.

    No snow yet (7:52 am), and the reports are it will be down our way around 11:00. We'll see.

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